Educational Articles

Care & Wellness

  • Bathing is very important for the proper maintenance of feathers. The dry air in our homes created by central heating and air conditioning is not conducive to the maintenance of healthy feathers and skin, so pet birds should be encouraged to bathe at least three to four times a week. This handout provides helpful tips and safety precautions for bathing your bird.

  • Elongated beak and/or toenails are reasons for veterinary care in all pet birds. Beaks should not be trimmed regularly unless performed by an avian veterinarian. Toenail trimming may be done at home, but only when taught by an experienced bird breeder/owner or avian veterinarian.

  • If they are well looked after, including proper diet and husbandry, bearded dragons are reasonably hardy animals. Common health conditions of pet bearded dragons include CANV, atadenovirus, metabolic bone disease, parasites, infectious stomatitis (mouth rot), and respiratory infections. Any change from normal is cause for concern and should be immediately evaluated by your veterinarian.

  • The bearded dragon is a very popular small to medium-sized pet lizard. Bearded dragons are omnivorous, meaning they eat both plant and animal-based foods, including insects. They should consume a diet that is 50% insects and 50% green leafy vegetables. This handout is a general guide for feeding pet bearded dragons a nutritious and balanced diet.

  • Bearded dragons have specific environmental requirements to thrive as our pets. This handout outlines their housing needs, including enclosure size, appropriate bedding, preferred accessories, and necessary lighting and temperature control.

  • Bearded dragons are well-known small to medium-sized lizards. They are currently considered one of the most popular pet lizards for all ages. Owners often refer to their pets as 'beardies'. This handout explains how they differ from other pets and provides tips for selecting a healthy beardie to keep as your pet.

  • Bearded dragons are susceptible to several health problems; understanding them will help you prevent them from occurring in your pet and know when to seek veterinary attention. Problems described in this handout include salmonellosis, avascular necrosis, tail rot, abscesses, and dystocia (egg binging).

  • There is a wide range of non-pharmaceutical products designed to improve a pet's behavior. There is little oversight for many of these products which means that any given product may not work for your pet. Ask your veterinarian before using any over-the-counter product for your pet. The label “natural” does not guarantee a product is safe to use in dogs and cats.

  • Several products are available to help with behavior management in cats. Various products promote play and exercise, provide cognitive stimulation, allow safe outdoor exploration, and assist with anxiety or undesirable behavior (as part of your veterinarian's treatment program for these problems).

  • There are numerous products on the market that have been designed to help prevent undesirable behavior in dogs. Leashes, harnesses, and head halters are needed to keep pets under control, especially when outdoors.